Upcoming Lectures of Interest to our Members

Part of our ongoing mission is to educate and expand knowledge of architecture in Baltimore and beyond. As a courtesy we occasionally post non-BAF events that meet our mission and may be of interest to our members. In this post we cover two upcoming events:


The Latrobe Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians proudly presents

“Fortress of Finance: A History of the U.S. Treasury Building”

Lecture by Pamela Scott, Architectural Historian

Thursday, February 9, 2012
6:30 P.M. – light refreshments
7:00 P.M. – lecture

The National Trust for Historic Preservation
1785 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC

T.U. Walter, Alteration of the Treasury Building’s East Facade, n.d.

The apparently “unified” exterior of the U.S. Treasury Building belies that it was created by five major Greek Revival architects and was built over four decades. Robert Mills won the 1836 competition and each of his successors-Thomas U. Walter, Ammi B. Young, Isaiah Rogers, and Alfred B. Mullett- changed the design of his predecessor. All of the architects faced similar problems to varying degrees: politically motivated congressional investigations; labor unrest; and timely delivery of materials. Each explored how emerging technologies could be applied to facilitate the rapid and orderly construction of the largest federal building of its time. At the same time, each architect expressed his individual interpretation of America’s foray into the revival of Greek architecture. Characteristic exterior and interior features associated with each of the architects and the draftsman J. Goldsborough Bruff will be clarified. Because the text of Fortress of Finance was cut by twenty percent, the lecture will also include a longer discussion of the construction of Mullett’s Cash Room than appears in the book.

Engraving after lost Robert Mills perspective of the Treasury Building

Pamela Scott is currently an independent scholar. Ms. Scott recently completed a major history of the U.S. Treasury Building, 1798-2005 titled Fortress of Finance, published in June 2010.

The lecture takes place at The National Trust for Historic Preservation, 1785 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC.

Cost

Reservations are not required.

$10.00 for Latrobe Chapter members
student members (full time) free with ID
$18.00 for non-members.

For general information, please see the Latrobe Chapter website at www.Latrobechaptersah.org, or contact:

Christine Henry
(202)-744-8123
christine.rae.henry@gmail.com


“Mr. Garrett’s Palace” : The Golden Age Elegance of Baltimore at the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion

 

Jim Garrison – John Russell Pope: Transcendent Classicist

February 12, 2012, 2:00 pm

Jim Garrison

Presented by The Garrett-Jacobs Mansion Endowment Fund in association with AIA Baltimore, Baltimore Architecture Foundation, Baltimore Heritage

The residential commissions of the Garrett, Frick, and Jacobs families were crucial to Pope’s career. Mr. Garrison will discuss Pope’s important houses, their immediate precedents, and how Pope’s clients and work in Baltimore were some of the most significant of his career. Mr. Garrison, AIA, is the author of Mastering Tradition: The Residential Architecture of John Russell Pope.

Cost

$20 per person-discounts for Friends of the Mansion, AIA credit

Send checks or credit card information to:

GJMEF
11 W. Mt. Vernon Place
Baltimore, MD 21201

Questions?

Please contact:

Dale Whitehead, Executive Director
The Engineers Club of Baltimore
Phone: 410-539-6914, Ext. 106
dale@esb.org

Prior to the presentation, we invite you to enjoy an elegant Champagne Brunch at the Mansion – $35 per person all-inclusive

Reservations are required, along with advance payment by check by phone or credit card. Make reservations for no later than 12:30 p.m. to provide ample time prior to performance.

The Garrett-Jacobs Mansion, a registered National Historic Landmark and one of the nation’s most exquisite homes, offers the perfect venue to discuss the opulence of Baltimore’s Golden Age. In the nineteenth century, the New York Times referred to the Mansion as “Mr. Garrett’s Palace.”